Diet Decisions for Latter-day Saints by Joyce Kinmont (1999)

From Books in Word of Wisdom Literature by Jane Birch

Read Joyce Kinmont’s story here, “We thought we were joining a vegetarian church”

Kinmont_Diet Decisions new largeJoyce Kinmont, Diet Decisions for Latter-day Saints (Grantsville, Utah: Archive Publishers, 1999).


To a great extent we are physically what we eat… What needs additional emphasis are the positive aspects—the need for vegetables, fruits, and grains, particularly wheat. In most cases, the closer these can be, when eaten, to their natural state —without overrefinement and processing — the healthier we will be. To a significant degree, we are an overfed and undernourished nation digging an early grave with our teeth, and lacking the energy that could be ours because we overindulge in junk foods…. we need a generation of young people who, as Daniel, eat in a more healthy manner than to fare on the “king’s meat”—and whose countenances show it.

– TEACHINGS OF EZRA TAFT BENSON, p. 476-77


Since the diseases which take most lives among the Latter-day Saints have distinct nutritional  relationships, it is safe to conclude that the dietary life habits of the people are at least partly at fault. One can not say that to refrain from smoking and from drinking tea, coffee or alcohol is to keep fully the Word of Wisdom. That is a big step toward maintaining health but it is not full obedience to the law.

The many “do’s” in the inspired document are as important as the “don’t’s.” Unquestionably, the Word of Wisdom is not lived completely or the people would receive a greater fullness of the promised reward—a long life of physical health, while the destroying angel of sickness and death would pass by and not slay them.

ELDER JOHN A. WIDTSOE and LEAH WIDTSOE, THE WORD OF WISDOM: A MODERN INTERPRETATION, p. 21


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction: It’s Just Me, a Mom!……………………………………………………….. 1

Acknowledgement: In Appreciation………………………………………………………. 5

  1. Are There Early Graves?…………………………………………………………………….. 9
  2. Not Commanded in Al! Things……………………………………………………………. 13
  3. Let Us Manifest Our Feelings…………………………………………………………….. 19
  4. May I Manifest My Feelings………………………………………………………………. 23
  5. No Health in the Navel ……………………………………………………………………..  27
  6. Conspiring Men……………………………………………………………………………….. 33
  7. The Eating of Flesh …………………………………………………………………………..  39
  8. The “Cooties” Must be Fed………………………………………………………………… 49
  9. Design Your Own Vaccination …………………………………………………………….  55
  10. Playing Around with Hormones…………………………………………………………… 61
  11. Milk Does a Body Harm …………………………………………………………………….  71
  12. The Chemical Balancing Act ……………………………………………………………….  79
  13. Fluoride – Mass Medication ……………………………………………………………….  93
  14. Expendable Body Parts & Other Divine Mistakes…………………………………… 97
  15. Multiplying our Seed ………………………………………………………………………. 101
  16. Of These You May Freely Eat…………………………………………………………….. 107
  17. Of These Tom Will Freely Eat……………………………………………………………. 111
  18. Think Enzymes ………………………………………………………………………………. 117
  19. To Juice or Not to Juice……………………………………………………………………. 123
  20. Three Steps Forward………………………………………………………………………. 127
  21. Feeding the Baby…………………………………………………………………………… 131
  22. Our Digestive System ……………………………………………………………………..  137
  23. Healing by Faith and with Herbs ………………………………………………………… 141
  24. Preparing for Calamities ………………………………………………………………….  147
  25. Was Christ a Vegetarian? …………………………………………………………………  149
  26. The Fifth Happiness ………………………………………………………………………..  155

Appendix: Emmaleigh’s Story: I Feel My Savior’s Love …………………………..  161


Introduction

Just Me, A Mom

I was born in a quiet part of New York City in 1941. Nearly every day my mother pushed my carriage to the corner grocery store for a few provisions, mostly canned goods. We’d go to the vegetable stand for fresh produce that had just been brought in from the farm where it had been grown in rich soil with few chemicals. We’d go to the bakery for fresh bread without additives, to the butcher where the meat was fresh. My Mom would point out some pork chops and he’d wrap them in paper. He’d grind a pound of beef while we watched. The meat was not full of added hormones and antibiotics.

There were jars of baby food for me back then, but no boxes of macaroni and cheese, no frozen pizza, no frosted flakes, and nothing for the microwave because it hadn’t been invented yet. This wasn’t the best possible diet, not what the Lord outlined, but certainly it was not as bad as today’s standard American diet.

My mother was very healthy most of her life and passed away at 82 from a stroke. She had been hospitalized shortly before with diverticulitis. My grandmother had been very healthy until her late eighties when she died of colon cancer.

Things changed with me. I began to have problems similar to both of theirs in my fifties. Our daughter—the one I started right out on lots of cottage cheese and yellow cheese because I thought the protein was important—moved ahead of me, having the first appendectomy in the family in her twenties. If she lives on the typical American diet, her chances of breast cancer are 1 out of 9 (up from 1 in 14 in 1960).

The University of Utah says “Breast cancer frequency appears to be significantly increased by . . . . high-fat diets.” Should we women choose to eat more like Daniel, we could greatly reduce that danger. In fact, if the Lord’s promises are true, we should be able to pretty well eliminate the cancer possibility.

Diabetes, cancer, and heart disease—all three medically acknowledged as diet-related—are moving down through the generations. These diseases were once almost unknown in our country; then they were confined to the elderly; now they are epidemic in middle age and are becoming common among the young. We see children under ten dying from heart attack; two-year-olds with cancer, hundreds of youngsters becoming insulin dependent.

In our family we have 13 young grandchildren, most of them being fed like most of your children—meat, cheese, milk, and lots of highly processed, high-sugar foods. Statistically speaking, there is tragedy ahead for all of us.

As I’ve visited with homeschoolers over the past 25 years, I’ve seen increasing problems with children who would be labeled A.D.D. and medicated if they were in public schools. I’ve seen behavior problems and health problems that make homeschooling extremely difficult. Families are suffering terribly. While there are many factors involved in correcting these problems, a change of diet seems to be the most logical place to start.

So I write. It’s the best tool I have for warning my children and anyone else who will listen. I write without any special credentials—just me, a mom, hoping that you’ll see things you’ve never noticed before, that you’ll question things you’ve automatically accepted before, that you will ask your Heavenly Father to open up truths you’ve never asked about before. It’s my desire to encourage you, to influence you, to BEG you to take seriously the Lord’s instructions to us in the Word of Wisdom and the scientific findings of our day that support it.

I realize that diet can be a divisive, emotional issue. The goal here is neither to win everyone over to my opinion nor to define God, but rather to work together to discover Him and His will. To be His, we must be as one; we must think and be like Him. I state emphatically that my conclusions are my own and reflect only what I have learned so far. They don’t necessarily represent the doctrine of the LDS church—however, I would never live by or promote any doctrine for which there was not plenty of validation in church sources.

 Joyce Kinmont


Acknowledgement

IN APPRECIATION
Tom L. Rodgers, Friend and Mentor

 there is a strange thing in the land;
a wild man bath come among us . . .
all men were offended
because of him.
Moses 38, 37

It was on Easter Sunday, 1996, when Thomas Rodgers, a “wild man in the land,” first came to my house to speak at a small fireside. I had met him just a few days before and wanted my family and friends to hear his message.

Tom spoke long into the night, or early morning, until every last person had gotten every last question answered. He spent the night with us and continued answering our questions into the next afternoon. For several years thereafter, this “wild man” continued to take us on a wild ride.

Most of what I know about diet I’ve learned from Tom. He’s made the biology come alive for me. He’s made nutrition simple. He’s given our family the keys to good health. He’s given us treasures of knowledge. Without his help and his informational contributions, this book could not have been written.

Tom is not without controversy, but the controversy is to be expected — his is often an unwelcome message. As a messenger Tom is relentless. He can be stubborn, obnoxious, persistent, and “in your face.” He — and his knowledge — can make people extremely uncomfortable.

On the other hand, Tom loves the gospel and the Brethren. He was raised in a church family in association with many church leaders (he was once spanked by an apostle who later became a prophet). He knows, and often plants himself in the paths of influential men — and they often consider his findings.

In the summer of 1990 in a Salt Lake City hospital Tom was near death—the victim of cancer, four strokes, and heart disease. He perceived himself to have slipped through the veil where he pled to return to life for the sake of his wife and children. Permission was granted upon his covenant that “nothing more was to die so that he might live.” The hospital dietician received her own confirming message and became his “guardian angel in the hospital kitchen.” Though grateful for the skills of his physicians, he asked to be removed from the drugs. The hospital brought in a Chinese acupuncturist who taught Tom’s wife and daughter to relieve his pain.

As his speech, sight, and ambulation began to return, Tom spent the next couple of years visiting the Church historical archives, learning all he could about the gospel and the Lord’s wishes for our diet. He spoke with some of the best Hebrew scholars. He understands the Jews, knows their records and their history. He studied biology and disease and knows the agricultural, food, and pharmaceutical industries.

In June of 1996, I asked Tom to speak about learning disabilities, Ritalin, and diet at our home school conference. I asked him to be gentle; this would be a sensitive issue. True to form, he was blunt and forceful, and many were offended. However, there are always some who are helped, and I’m sure the Lord loves him for his tireless devotion.

Should you want to contact Tom personally, you can call him at 801-298-9095. You can also visit his website at www.tomrodgers.org, remembering, please, that I do not necessarily endorse everything there.

 


Chapter 1

ARE THERE EARLY GRAVES?

To a significant degree, we are an overfed and
undernourished nation digging an early
grave with our teeth
. . . .
President Ezra Taft Benson

There are early graves?
Didn’t you always think we just stayed on Earth until our mission is done? “When it’s your turn to go, you go.”

We are digging these early graves?
With our teeth? By the way we eat? Didn’t you always think diseases just jumped out and zapped you?

Our diet influences health and longevity?
If food does influence our health and longevity, are we also
RESPONSIBLE?

Whatever was President Benson thinking of? Of course Brigham Young said the same thing—three times in one chapter of the 1998-9 Priesthood/Relief Society lesson manual:

The Americans, as a nation, are killing themselves with their vices and high living. . . . Dispense with your multitudinous dishes, and, depend upon it, you will do much towards preserving your families from sickness, disease and death.

Be careful of your bodies; be prudent in laying out your energies, for when you are old you will need the strength and power you are now wasting. Preserve your lives. Until you know and practice this, you are not thoroughly good soldiers nor wise stewards.

It is a piece of good counsel which the Lord desires his people to observe, that they may live on the earth until the measure of their creation is full. This is the object the Lord had in view in giving that Word of Wisdom. To those who observe it he will give great wisdom and understanding, increasing their health, giving strength and endurance to the faculties of their bodies and minds until they shall be full of years upon the earth. This will be their blessing if they will observe his word with a good and willing heart and in faithfulness before the Lord.

TEACHINGS OF PRESIDENTS OF THE
CHURCH: BRIGHAM YOUNG, P. 28-9

It was so much more comforting to believe that we are simply victims or what’s in the air or in our gene pool, or that all things happen exactly as they are supposed to, or that our sicknesses are a “refiner’s fire.” It was easier to believe that no man dies before his time and “everything causes cancer” and, in so believing, give ourselves permission to live as we choose—our will be done.

Of course the Lord can keep us alive in spite of ourselves. We all know of incidents in which folks have been kept on the earth even after multiple heart attacks or supposedly terminal cancer.

We might postulate that:

  • The laws of health are in effect whether we know and understand them or not.
  • Our ill health may cause us a less-enjoyable “turn on earth,” but the Lord may keep us here anyway if He needs us here more than there.
  • Then again, He may not.
  • There must be early graves because the prophets have said so.
  • We do have responsibility to do what we can in keeping our earthly tabernacle fit for service in the Kingdom.

Kinmont_LightbulbHere’s a new thought: Maybe this has
something to do with the concept of Grace
“after all you can do.”

DECISIONS:

What is my responsibility in maintaining good health and preserving my life?

What am I going to do about it?

 


Chapter 2

 NOT COMMANDED IN ALL THINGS

My father began his career as a chemist for a printing ink company, worked his way up the corporate ladder, and was sent to California to open a branch office when I was in sixth grade. One of his corporate customers was Johnny Brown. They golfed and lunched and social-drank together for the next decade.

Then, in Salt Lake City, a new manager was needed for the Deseret News Press, the printing arm of the Church. Strangely, Johnny Brown was hired to fill that position. He and his wife joked to my parents about their new home in Salt Lake City next to a “stake house,” whatever that might be. (They all knew about “steak” houses.)

My father began making regular trips to Salt Lake to sell ink to his friend and would bring home books and magazines that had been printed with his company’s ink. When he was done analyzing the quality of the work, he would turn the materials over to me. Soon Johnny Brown moved on to another job and the trips ended, but my husband and I had been trapped. We invited the two young men into our home.

One day the missionaries took my husband’s cigarettes and left us something called the Word of Wisdom to read. Naively, we took it at face value: in this church, folks would not be eating much meat. We decided we could do that and went happily off to our first church social. It was July in southern California.

One of the books my father had given me was a commentary on the Doctrine and Covenants, so we knew that Hyrum Smith, who held joint Presidency with Joseph and possessed the same keys, had said “.. . and why [is meat] to be used in famine? Because all domesticated animals would naturally die, and may as well be made use of by man, as not.” We were shocked to see not just meat, but “unclean” swine’s flesh.

We had a testimony that the church was the Lord’s authorized organization on earth and were soon baptized, but we wondered why the behavior of the Saints did not match the doctrine. I continued to watch for information from the Prophets about diet. I searched the Journal of Discourses. I read Elder Widtsoe’s book which I learned had been used as the priesthood lesson manual one year. (Strange that it had made little impact.) It seemed to me that the latter-day prophets had tried to lead out but no one was following.

I wondered why more wasn’t said in current Conference messages; then one day I was in the church office building and I saw a matronly lady, someone’s secretary no doubt, walking through the offices with a huge chocolate sheet cake. I had worked in an office; they celebrate everything! It hit me forcefully: the prophets can declare doctrine, but they really can’t fight against the will of the people.

As Brigham Young said:

Take people in every capacity of life, and their wills are first and foremost. You can gain and lead the affections of the people, but you cannot scare them, nor whip them, nor burn them to do right against their wills. The human family will die to gratify their wills.

 TEACHINGS OF PRESIDENTS OF THE
CHURCH: BRIGHAM YOUNG, p. 203

And maybe the Lord had more important things to accomplish. President Benson was the Prophet then, and he tried so hard to get us all to read the Book of Mormon and to study the Constitution and learn the proper role of government. Not much of that happened either.

I wish I could say that we continued to study nutrition and improved our diet well beyond what was given in the Word of Wisdom. We didn’t. We kept sweets to a moderate level and didn’t fry foods, but we sure did love dairy products. There were plenty of warning voices out there, but we took license from the fact that dairy wasn’t mentioned in the D&C and that nothing was being said about it from Salt Lake. We avoided meat most of the time, and when we were asked why we didn’t eat it we said, “We do eat meat—in times of famine and at church socials.”

For that little bit of obedience we were blessed with good health for ourselves and our family. There were no major illnesses, no major medical bills.

The Word of Wisdom was given for the least of us, “adapted to the capacity of the weak and the weakest.” Sometimes I did wonder what it was adapted from. What more did the Lord have for us?

Then three years ago we met Tom Rodgers, and I stopped waiting for more from Salt Lake. I already had the testimony; I just didn’t understand the science. That we began to learn from Tom.

To those who have been saying, “I’ll stop eating meat when the Prophet does,” may I share something I’ve learned? In a classic talk in the April 1965 conference address, then Apostle Benson tried to get members to pay more attention to the Prophet. Using food storage as an illustration, he said “…there are some today who will not start storing until the Church comes out with a detailed monthly home storage program. Now suppose that never happens. We still cannot say we have not been told.”

He introduced the talk by quoting D&C 58:26-29, “not commanded in all things.” He said:

Usually the Lord gives us the overall objectives to be accomplished and some guidelines to follow, but he expects us to work out most of the details and methods. The methods and procedures are usually developed through study and prayer and by living so that we can obtain and follow the prompting of the Spirit. Less spiritually advanced people, such as those in the days of Moses, had to be commanded in many things. Today those spiritually alert look at the objectives, check the guidelines laid down by the Lord and his prophets, and then prayerfully act—without having to be commanded “in all things.” This attitude prepares men for godhood.

The overall objective to be accomplished in missionary work, temple work, providing for the needy, and bringing up our children in righteousness has always been the same,’ only our methods to accomplish these objectives have varied Any faithful member in this dispensation, no matter when he lived, could have found righteous methods to have carried out these objectives without having to wait for the latest, specific Church-wide program.

Sometimes the Lord hopefully waits on his children to act on their own, and when they do not, they lose the greater prize, and the Lord will either drop the entire matter and let them suffer the consequences or else he will have to spell it out in greater detail Usually, I fear, the more he has to spell it out, the smaller is our reward.

Besides the freedom issue, or as a foundation for it, President Benson tried to get us to read the Book of Mormon. Those were his main topics, but he also encouraged private schooling and attention to the positive aspects of the Word of Wisdom.

Very early in his church service President Benson said:

I wish that every Latter-day Saint could say and mean it with all his heart. “I’ll go where you want me to go. I’ll say what you want me to say. I’ll be what you want me to be.” (Hymns, 1985, No. 270) If we could all do that, we would be assured of the maximum of happiness here and exaltation in the celestial kingdom of 6od hereafter.

TEACHINGS OF EZRA TAFT BENSON,
p. 344

Kinmont_LightbulbAnother new thought: I’ll eat what you want me
to eat, Dear Lord

In a more recent expression of frustration, one that cuts me to the quick every time I read it, Brother Packer said in the October 1996 Conference:

President Harold B. Lee told me once of a conversation he had with Elder Charles A. Collis of the Quorum of the Twelve. Brother Collis had remarked that the gift of discernment was an awesome burden to carry. To see clearly what is ahead and yet find members slow to respond or resistant to counsel or even rejecting the witness of the apostles and prophets brings deep sorrow. . . .

There are limits to what the Spirit permits us to say. . . .

DECISIONS:

Do I want to wait for the Prophet to tell me exactly what to eat, or can I figure this out through what’s already been said, through science, and by the Spirit?

Will more information be revealed as more people take seriously the Lord’s law of health?

 


Chapter 3

LET US MANIFEST OUR FEELINGS

When my husband and I joined the Church, we found our selves on a spiritual island. We each had one unmarried sibling, his parents lived 8 hours away, and my parents were soon to be transferred to Chicago. While we lacked the support that a strong family could give, we were blessed with the freedom to make changes without insulting the family culture.

For church members with large families, change can be a difficult problem. To suddenly stop eating a particular food is to say that we were wrong, however innocently, to have eaten it in the past. Worse, it may say that our parents were wrong, however innocently, to have fed it to us.

When a couple decides to make drastic dietary changes, they find themselves suddenly out of step with their parents—unless their parents change too, but then the parents will be out of step with their other children. If some of the other children change too, they will be out of step with their in-laws. And the ripple goes on.

A change in diet can be an automatic sentence to a more isolated life. It’s hard to be different—especially in “weird” ways—at family parties, church activities, outings with friends. What do the children do at Primary? What about Scout campouts? What about Young Women’s activities? Of course, this is, after all, a church; so no one should have my unkind feelings toward another. . . .

We mortals do attach an amazing amount of emotion to food. When one mother spoke of her newly-emptied nest, saying how she missed that last child because she “had no one to fix breakfast for,” I made a mental note to be sure to build working relationships with my children that could endure into adulthood. Actually that was easy for me—I’m a non-cook anyway—but what about the woman who has spent her whole life fixing unhealthy food, laced with love, for her family? What a trauma to think she might have done them a disservice. How could she ever make them happy now with carrot juice and spinach?

Pioneer families had much to bind them together; their very existence required cooperative teamwork. Now fathers work away from home, and the State has taken the children away for the major part of the day, even taking over the primary teaching role—and has done it in such a way that the family has been subordinated. There is little left for mothers to do but feed and clothe the children, so naturally many mothers put their energy into cooking. Then when the children grow up, they must be enticed back home with delicious, fatty, sugary food.

Brigham Young had problems with food being emotionally tied to hospitality. He understood the Word of Wisdom and tried to interest the people in it, with little success. He experienced what those of us who try to live a plant-centered diet today experience—it’s so much easier at home, so much harder when you travel. I understand Brother Brigham’s frustration:

When we go on a trip to the settlements and stop at the brethren’s house, it is, ‘Brother Brigham, let us manifest our feelings toward you and your company’ I tell them to do so, but give me a piece of Johnnycake [cornbread]; I would rather have it than their pies and tarts and sweet meats. Let me have something that will sustain nature and leave my stomach and whole system clear to receive the Spirit of the Lord and be free from headache and pains of every kind.

TEACHINGS OF THE PRESIDENTS OF THE
CHURCH: BRIGHAM YOUNG, p. 213

Beyond emotion, many faithful Saints have heavy financial ties to the food industry. They own restaurants, grocery stores, ranches; it’s their livelihood. A dietary change for any of them would cause a major upheaval.

Some people may want to make dietary changes and are not able. A prophet, perhaps, must wait until he has a people willing to follow. A wife may need her husband’s support, or a husband his wife’s. Children may need the help of their parents, and some people may have political or employment related social situations to deal with.

The real heartbreakers are the situations in which a family member has already been lost or badly harmed by a disease that the family later learns might have been cured by dietary changes. I cannot comprehend the pain these families must endure.

I suppose in the early days of the Church when everyone was a new convert there were similar problems. Imagine having to give up all you had for a “silly” new church that believes in a God with body and passions, baptism for the dead, and golden plates. How difficult that must have been.

Just as many of those heartaches and difficulties passed with time, so will some of our Word of Wisdom difficulties. In the three years since we stopped eating animal products, we’ve seen much better selections in restaurants and in the grocery stores.

As more people reap benefits from a change in diet and more information is gathered, family members will be less concerned about offending the family culture and more concerned about blessing their loved ones with new information.

 

DECISIONS:

Does overeating block my communication with the spirit?

Do I have pains that could be connected to diet?

Is food tied to emotion in destructive ways in my family?

When my children leave home, what will entice them back?

Should I go on reading this book now or should I wait?

If I decide to make a diet change, what price would I have to pay?

Is it worth it?

 


Chapter 4

MAY I MANIFEST MY FEELINGS

 When men live to the age of a tree,
their food will be fruit.
DISCOURSES OF BRIGHAM YOUNG,
p. 190

The word “vegetarian” means different things to different people, but if it means someone who does not eat meat and is concerned about the treatment of animals, then I am one. If it means someone who believes that anyone who eats meat will go to hell, then that is not me.

The word “vegan” (popularly pronounced VEE-gun) is even trickier. Satan has so sullied the term that many of us considered coining a new one; but he’d just go after that one too. If the word “vegan” means someone who does not eat any animal food—meat or dairy, and is concerned about the humane treatment of animals, then I am a vegan. If it means someone who blows up McDonald’s or undresses and lies in a coffin on a Salt Lake street corner, or who would put animal life before human life, that’s not me.

The whole argument over whether or not we who are LDS “may” eat meat is a distraction, like a silly cartoon in which we are running full speed down the road but the fox keeps putting up detour signs to send us around in circles. The real issues are that (a) the Lord has given us an energy force packaged in fresh fruits and vegetables and stored in grains and seeds, and we have not appreciated it; (b) we must overcome our venomous disposition, and (c) obedience.

Here’s where I stand: There is an animal food diet and there is a plant food diet, like two parallel paths. In our culture, almost all of us are on the animal food path. We are told that the Millennial diet will be fruit, and by happy coincidence, the plant diet given in the Word of Wisdom leads us right to the Millennial diet.

I’m switching over to the plant food road now. I am fortunate to be able to—the information has been brought to my attention, the food is available in my area and my century, my family is supportive, and my life’s calling makes it possible. To eat in a way that brings me better health is good; if that change takes me to where the Lord will someday want me to be, that is an added blessing.

Others may switch over later. Some will change later than they should have—I did—and will pay a price for that delay—I have. Some may have very good reasons for waiting. The Lord may actually want them to stay on the animal-diet path for a while longer. I don’t argue with anyone’s personal revelation, and it’s not my place to judge, but I will keep on waving a flag for the plant-centered diet, especially when I see suffering that could be helped.

Support for those on the animal-food path will be found in some scriptures and in some words from church leaders, but when all the information available is taken into consideration, the body of information in support of the plant-food diet is by far the greater. Actually, the debate ended for us at “it is pleasing to me” in D&C 89:14.

Is beauty really in the eye of the beholder? Or does it ex-ist independent of the beholder and his ability to recognize it? Beauty and truth exist independent of our ability to rec¬ognize them. Thus, there are not different-but-equal diets for different people. There is just the Lord’s diet and the other guy’s. The Lord gives His, not to spoil our fun but to bless us with good health and intelligence. The other guy wants to bring us misery and suffering and to stop us from our earthly missions. If our goal is to become as one with our Lord, we must at some point see diet just as He sees it.

We might still chose to be “vegan” if the scriptures were silent, simply because of the temporal benefits; however, I do not, and can not, separate the religious and the health issues because the Lord doesn’t. I measure all of my diet decisions against the instructions we’ve been given, although I am left with a great many questions. Hopefully as more of us change paths, more will be revealed.

 Kinmont_Millennial-Diet

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